juldea: (Default)
Hi guys! I'm going to create a meme here, based on many before me.

NPR just released the results of its summer readers' poll looking for the top 100 science fiction and fantasy books (or series.) Let's do a "which ones have we read" poll!

Bold what you've read completely
Italicize what you have read partially
Leave whatever other notes you want!

Top 100 Science Fiction, Fantasy Books )

*eyes list* Looks like I need to catch up!
juldea: (Default)
Hi guys! I'm going to create a meme here, based on many before me.

NPR just released the results of its summer readers' poll looking for the top 100 science fiction and fantasy books (or series.) Let's do a "which ones have we read" poll!

Bold what you've read completely
Italicize what you have read partially
Leave whatever other notes you want!

Top 100 Science Fiction, Fantasy Books )

*eyes list* Looks like I need to catch up!
juldea: (geek girl)
One step closer to being moved in... I've unpacked the books onto the bookshelf. At the same time, synched up with LibraryThing.
Thus, synching up my list of borrowed books:

Ballet Shoes borrowed from [livejournal.com profile] chaiya
Slaughterhouse Five borrowed from ???
The Long Night of Centauri Prime borrowed from either [livejournal.com profile] londo or [livejournal.com profile] laura47
Armies of Light and Dark (2 copies) borrowed from probably [livejournal.com profile] londo and [livejournal.com profile] laura47
Out of the Darkness (2 copies) borrowed from probably [livejournal.com profile] londo and [livejournal.com profile] laura47
Hogfather borrowed from ???
Biting the Sun borrowed from [livejournal.com profile] rosinavs
Wild Cards: Dead Man's Hand borrowed from my coworker
Wild Cards: Ace in the Hole borrowed from my coworker
Naamah's Kiss borrowed from [livejournal.com profile] shadowravyn
Statistics textbook borrowed from [livejournal.com profile] etherial

I believe everything else belongs to me. If you disagree, let me know. Also, please don't laugh at my guilty pleasure taste in books. ;)
juldea: (geek girl)
One step closer to being moved in... I've unpacked the books onto the bookshelf. At the same time, synched up with LibraryThing.
Thus, synching up my list of borrowed books:

Ballet Shoes borrowed from [livejournal.com profile] chaiya
Slaughterhouse Five borrowed from ???
The Long Night of Centauri Prime borrowed from either [livejournal.com profile] londo or [livejournal.com profile] laura47
Armies of Light and Dark (2 copies) borrowed from probably [livejournal.com profile] londo and [livejournal.com profile] laura47
Out of the Darkness (2 copies) borrowed from probably [livejournal.com profile] londo and [livejournal.com profile] laura47
Hogfather borrowed from ???
Biting the Sun borrowed from [livejournal.com profile] rosinavs
Wild Cards: Dead Man's Hand borrowed from my coworker
Wild Cards: Ace in the Hole borrowed from my coworker
Naamah's Kiss borrowed from [livejournal.com profile] shadowravyn
Statistics textbook borrowed from [livejournal.com profile] etherial

I believe everything else belongs to me. If you disagree, let me know. Also, please don't laugh at my guilty pleasure taste in books. ;)
juldea: (geek girl)
A few various people have done a "list 15 books you like" meme, but I've been inspired by [livejournal.com profile] londo's ponderings over his list to instead list 15 books that are extremely important to me and my growth andor change as a person.

1. Ayn Rand, Atlas Shrugged. I've never been apologetic about it; Rand is my favorite fantasy author, and I reread her fiction every few years. Finding her books in junior year of high school was monumentally important to my evolution as a person.

2. J.R. "Bob" Dobbs, The Book of the Subgenius. My first look into alternate... anything.

3. Margaret Weis & Tracy Hickman, The Dragonlance Chronicles, and if it's necessary to pick one, Dragons of Winter Night. The first fantasy books I ever found. I pick Winter Night because one of my only memories from pre-high-school was ambushing my brother (who was the owner of the books) as he came home one day to rant at him about the "great reveal" of the book.

4. "J", The Sensuous Woman. Honestly, I bought this book off of the 5-cent rack at the library just to shock a classmate. Then, one day, I ended up reading it. And I think I benefited in the long run.

5. Herman Roucher, Ode to Billy Joe. Lent to me by [livejournal.com profile] red_ervish in college, one of the first books to ... well, actually, if I tell you what it's about, it spoils the plot.

6. Robert Pirsig, Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance. Critically important to my curiosity in philosophy and values.

7. Willo Davis Roberts, The Girl with the Silver Eyes. Okay, so maybe THIS was the first fantasy I ever read - Dragonlance was just the first sword and dragons fantasy. This is a YA book about a girl with ESP powers due to her mother having been pregnant and working at a drug factory, and the girl's attempts to find the six other kids in the world who had also been born with these powers. It still sticks with me.

8. Lao-Tzu, Tao Te Ching. First Eastern philosophy/religion book I ever read, in high school.

9. Carl Sagan, Contact. Because there's so much out there, and we - I - need to keep looking.

10. John T. Molloy, The New Women's Dress for Success. I read this after college, and while I don't follow all of the rules (short women should apparently never, ever wear long skirts, and hair as long as mine is RIGHT out), I feel like it did inform me about businesswear when I didn't have a clue before.

...and now I'm getting kicked out of [livejournal.com profile] contradictacat's living room, so I'll have to finish later.
juldea: (geek girl)
A few various people have done a "list 15 books you like" meme, but I've been inspired by [livejournal.com profile] londo's ponderings over his list to instead list 15 books that are extremely important to me and my growth andor change as a person.

1. Ayn Rand, Atlas Shrugged. I've never been apologetic about it; Rand is my favorite fantasy author, and I reread her fiction every few years. Finding her books in junior year of high school was monumentally important to my evolution as a person.

2. J.R. "Bob" Dobbs, The Book of the Subgenius. My first look into alternate... anything.

3. Margaret Weis & Tracy Hickman, The Dragonlance Chronicles, and if it's necessary to pick one, Dragons of Winter Night. The first fantasy books I ever found. I pick Winter Night because one of my only memories from pre-high-school was ambushing my brother (who was the owner of the books) as he came home one day to rant at him about the "great reveal" of the book.

4. "J", The Sensuous Woman. Honestly, I bought this book off of the 5-cent rack at the library just to shock a classmate. Then, one day, I ended up reading it. And I think I benefited in the long run.

5. Herman Roucher, Ode to Billy Joe. Lent to me by [livejournal.com profile] red_ervish in college, one of the first books to ... well, actually, if I tell you what it's about, it spoils the plot.

6. Robert Pirsig, Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance. Critically important to my curiosity in philosophy and values.

7. Willo Davis Roberts, The Girl with the Silver Eyes. Okay, so maybe THIS was the first fantasy I ever read - Dragonlance was just the first sword and dragons fantasy. This is a YA book about a girl with ESP powers due to her mother having been pregnant and working at a drug factory, and the girl's attempts to find the six other kids in the world who had also been born with these powers. It still sticks with me.

8. Lao-Tzu, Tao Te Ching. First Eastern philosophy/religion book I ever read, in high school.

9. Carl Sagan, Contact. Because there's so much out there, and we - I - need to keep looking.

10. John T. Molloy, The New Women's Dress for Success. I read this after college, and while I don't follow all of the rules (short women should apparently never, ever wear long skirts, and hair as long as mine is RIGHT out), I feel like it did inform me about businesswear when I didn't have a clue before.

...and now I'm getting kicked out of [livejournal.com profile] contradictacat's living room, so I'll have to finish later.
juldea: (sleepy catball)
Today feels like it was poured over with the sticky, viscous fluid of melancholy. I'm mostly blaming it on lack of sleep, though a short conversation with [livejournal.com profile] londo about eight-month-old issues "helped" as well.

Tuesday nights have unofficially become self-date nights, so I'll likely be holing up with my cats tonight, maybe knitting, maybe finishing Madame Bovary (because what I need when I'm in a melancholy mood is Victorian realism, for sure!)

There are two happy things to mention:
1. I have a mystery package from Amazon.com arriving in the next couple of days. I didn't order anything from Amazon. Presents, yay! (Obligatory wishlist pimp)
2. A favorite online card site of mine, http://www.someecards.com has started selling t-shirts. Desirable.

But otherwise, I am :|
juldea: (sleepy catball)
Today feels like it was poured over with the sticky, viscous fluid of melancholy. I'm mostly blaming it on lack of sleep, though a short conversation with [livejournal.com profile] londo about eight-month-old issues "helped" as well.

Tuesday nights have unofficially become self-date nights, so I'll likely be holing up with my cats tonight, maybe knitting, maybe finishing Madame Bovary (because what I need when I'm in a melancholy mood is Victorian realism, for sure!)

There are two happy things to mention:
1. I have a mystery package from Amazon.com arriving in the next couple of days. I didn't order anything from Amazon. Presents, yay! (Obligatory wishlist pimp)
2. A favorite online card site of mine, http://www.someecards.com has started selling t-shirts. Desirable.

But otherwise, I am :|
juldea: (geek girl)
Squeeeee, Nick Pollotta is going to be at Lunacon!!!! Crap, now I have to unpack my boxes of books either tonight or tomorrow night. Signed copies of the Bureau 13 novels? Oh yes!

Wait, this might mean someone there will actually have copies of Damned Nation!

My fangirl heart is aflutter.

EDIT: ...crap. He's signing on Saturday morning at 11. [livejournal.com profile] usernamenumber and I are arriving Saturday, and hadn't yet figured out when. Ugh, that means leaving at an ungodly hour... but NICK POLLOTTA!
juldea: (geek girl)
Squeeeee, Nick Pollotta is going to be at Lunacon!!!! Crap, now I have to unpack my boxes of books either tonight or tomorrow night. Signed copies of the Bureau 13 novels? Oh yes!

Wait, this might mean someone there will actually have copies of Damned Nation!

My fangirl heart is aflutter.

EDIT: ...crap. He's signing on Saturday morning at 11. [livejournal.com profile] usernamenumber and I are arriving Saturday, and hadn't yet figured out when. Ugh, that means leaving at an ungodly hour... but NICK POLLOTTA!
juldea: (sheep french horn)
Tonight I went to SCA dance practice for the first time in about three years. While I had a good time, I don't see myself going back regularly. Due to the nature of the beast, it's still the same dances taught at the lowest-common-denominator level, and that doesn't capture my interest. The social aspect is good, but doesn't make up for the lack of interest otherwise. I did see some very nice people I hadn't seen in a very long time, though, and got some hugs and scratches and rubs in good ways. Yay people.

This leaves the option now of what to do with my Wednesday nights. [livejournal.com profile] jmspencer will not be running another D&D game, and AFAIK neither will londo. SCA dance isn't enough to be my regular commitment. So what could be? I do feel like I want something regularly social on my one free weeknight.

Things I'm interested in:
  • Gaming - finding another tabletop group maybe?
  • Dancing - either finding a bellydance class that meets Wed nights, or even some other form of dance, given the ability to scale the teaching to my level
  • Music making - joining a band/orchestra/choir
  • Crafting - a knitting circle, sewing class, etc
  • Flying - but I don't have the money now to take lessons, so that's moot
  • Learning - take some form of community/adult learning course?

    Any ideas? Alternately it may be possible to rework my schedule at work to make another night my early night, OR I could just scrap the idea of an early weeknight entirely and work the entire week 12-8. So, options. Many options. And probably I shouldn't be making any decisions right now anyway. But still, thinking!

    In other news, I have finally read The Strange Tale of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde and thoroughly enjoyed it. Thanks, [livejournal.com profile] alexx_kay!
  • juldea: (sheep french horn)
    Tonight I went to SCA dance practice for the first time in about three years. While I had a good time, I don't see myself going back regularly. Due to the nature of the beast, it's still the same dances taught at the lowest-common-denominator level, and that doesn't capture my interest. The social aspect is good, but doesn't make up for the lack of interest otherwise. I did see some very nice people I hadn't seen in a very long time, though, and got some hugs and scratches and rubs in good ways. Yay people.

    This leaves the option now of what to do with my Wednesday nights. [livejournal.com profile] jmspencer will not be running another D&D game, and AFAIK neither will londo. SCA dance isn't enough to be my regular commitment. So what could be? I do feel like I want something regularly social on my one free weeknight.

    Things I'm interested in:
  • Gaming - finding another tabletop group maybe?
  • Dancing - either finding a bellydance class that meets Wed nights, or even some other form of dance, given the ability to scale the teaching to my level
  • Music making - joining a band/orchestra/choir
  • Crafting - a knitting circle, sewing class, etc
  • Flying - but I don't have the money now to take lessons, so that's moot
  • Learning - take some form of community/adult learning course?

    Any ideas? Alternately it may be possible to rework my schedule at work to make another night my early night, OR I could just scrap the idea of an early weeknight entirely and work the entire week 12-8. So, options. Many options. And probably I shouldn't be making any decisions right now anyway. But still, thinking!

    In other news, I have finally read The Strange Tale of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde and thoroughly enjoyed it. Thanks, [livejournal.com profile] alexx_kay!
  • juldea: (sheep french horn)
    I guess reviewing books in twos is how I'll do this. I've been reading other books (borrowing Wild Cards books from my coworker, up to #4 currently) but these two are the ones I'm taking time to note.

    First, from [livejournal.com profile] alexx_kay's book potlatch, Kage Baker's The Anvil of the World. Disliked this quite greatly. This book was a bad LARP - no, it was three bad LARPs, a trilogy set in the same world with the same characters, but no easy transition between each third of the book. Why a bad LARP? This character is secretly a _____. That character is secretly this other character's ______. This character spends most of the books badly characterized, and then his backstory is written off as, "Oh, he's being controlled by a ____!" Those characters have a romance plot for no reason. This was less a book and more a set of complex plots and interactions that the author really wanted to put together, even though she failed at fleshing out the rest of it to make it, oh I don't know, make any sense. This was where you get the character sheet for your LARP character and it says, "You are very attracted to ____ and are very skilled at _____," but not given any background as to why, and you vaguely play out those roles but your heart really isn't in it. Nor was my heart in finishing this book, but I did it anyway out of a drive towards completionism, and now I can safely give it away and never read it again.

    Secondly, and also from the potlatch although I think it was technically in [livejournal.com profile] londo's book pile - I just pulled whatever was on the top of the pile of books in the living rooom - Joe Haldeman's The Forever War. This book was written oddly. It alternated between battle stories and the author's imaginings of how Earth society would evolve over the next 1,000-plus years as the main character hopped through the galaxy with the Army, relativity keeping him young while time passed on Earth. I enjoyed some of those various social imaginings; however, the book is aged just slightly in some of the writings around gender and sex roles. The book is supposedly very autobiographical regarding the author's experience in Vietnam, and I wonder to myself just how autobiographical, especially when little details are added that don't seem to add much to the plot but color the soldier's world a bit better. This one I liked, not with a gushing enthusiasm, but I immediately handed it to londo to add to his pile. Might read again, and will remember fondly.
    juldea: (sheep french horn)
    I guess reviewing books in twos is how I'll do this. I've been reading other books (borrowing Wild Cards books from my coworker, up to #4 currently) but these two are the ones I'm taking time to note.

    First, from [livejournal.com profile] alexx_kay's book potlatch, Kage Baker's The Anvil of the World. Disliked this quite greatly. This book was a bad LARP - no, it was three bad LARPs, a trilogy set in the same world with the same characters, but no easy transition between each third of the book. Why a bad LARP? This character is secretly a _____. That character is secretly this other character's ______. This character spends most of the books badly characterized, and then his backstory is written off as, "Oh, he's being controlled by a ____!" Those characters have a romance plot for no reason. This was less a book and more a set of complex plots and interactions that the author really wanted to put together, even though she failed at fleshing out the rest of it to make it, oh I don't know, make any sense. This was where you get the character sheet for your LARP character and it says, "You are very attracted to ____ and are very skilled at _____," but not given any background as to why, and you vaguely play out those roles but your heart really isn't in it. Nor was my heart in finishing this book, but I did it anyway out of a drive towards completionism, and now I can safely give it away and never read it again.

    Secondly, and also from the potlatch although I think it was technically in [livejournal.com profile] londo's book pile - I just pulled whatever was on the top of the pile of books in the living rooom - Joe Haldeman's The Forever War. This book was written oddly. It alternated between battle stories and the author's imaginings of how Earth society would evolve over the next 1,000-plus years as the main character hopped through the galaxy with the Army, relativity keeping him young while time passed on Earth. I enjoyed some of those various social imaginings; however, the book is aged just slightly in some of the writings around gender and sex roles. The book is supposedly very autobiographical regarding the author's experience in Vietnam, and I wonder to myself just how autobiographical, especially when little details are added that don't seem to add much to the plot but color the soldier's world a bit better. This one I liked, not with a gushing enthusiasm, but I immediately handed it to londo to add to his pile. Might read again, and will remember fondly.
    juldea: (raverkitty)
    This post contains NO SPOILERS. ;) (Moods all relate to the weekend and its socialness.)

    I had such a good time with friends this weekend! I got done with work on Friday, came home, packed up some stuff, and met [livejournal.com profile] nightskyre at the Riverside T stop. Note: getting to Riverside is slow and annoying these days, with the bus service. We then had an even more slow and annoying trip down a bumper-to-bumper MassPike, finally arriving in Worcester where I was dropped off at [livejournal.com profile] shadowravyn and [livejournal.com profile] shogunhb's house. A mob went out to dinner at Ruby Tuesday's and then split in groups - I was with one that went to see the Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix movie.

    This movie is definitely only for people who have read the book. It was pretty, and I like it as a manner of putting visuals to books I enjoy. However, it didn't impress me much as a movie. I think the books are just too long and too packed to be made into single movies.

    After the movie, our caravans went to Greendale Mall (where several copies of Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows were purchased) and then retuned to our starting point. [livejournal.com profile] shadowravyn, [livejournal.com profile] etherial, and I (joined for a short time by [livejournal.com profile] shogunhb) stayed up very very late reading, all crashing about 7am. I had set my alarm for 9:30, but - no surprises - I kept resetting it, finally waking up at 11:30 and calling [livejournal.com profile] nightskyre and [livejournal.com profile] anitra to pick me up for Saturday's adventures.

    I saw their new house, which is impressive. The idea of owning a house is a little overwhelming for me, the military brat. I mean, sure, my parents bought houses in many of the places we moved, but it was always known to be a temporary measure. Anyway. Their house is nice, with a great secret corridor, large yard, and sizeable pool. Also, the living room is big enough for the LoveSac. ;) We went out to eat at Red Robin, only my second time there, for yummy food. Afterwards we wandered the shops at Blackstone, spending a decent amount of time in Game Stop and Barnes & Noble. I bought several books at the latter.

    We returned home where my grand plans for the evening were thwarted by a shouldn't-have-been-unexpected crash atop the LoveSac. I napped for a few hours, and it was very nice. Afterwards there was more hanging out at the house (featuring power tools), swimming in their pool after dark, and a trip to Friendly's for ice cream before my bus ride back into Boston. Now I am home and happily sated from my fun weekend of hanging out with people I really like. ♥, guys.
    juldea: (raverkitty)
    This post contains NO SPOILERS. ;) (Moods all relate to the weekend and its socialness.)

    I had such a good time with friends this weekend! I got done with work on Friday, came home, packed up some stuff, and met [livejournal.com profile] nightskyre at the Riverside T stop. Note: getting to Riverside is slow and annoying these days, with the bus service. We then had an even more slow and annoying trip down a bumper-to-bumper MassPike, finally arriving in Worcester where I was dropped off at [livejournal.com profile] shadowravyn and [livejournal.com profile] shogunhb's house. A mob went out to dinner at Ruby Tuesday's and then split in groups - I was with one that went to see the Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix movie.

    This movie is definitely only for people who have read the book. It was pretty, and I like it as a manner of putting visuals to books I enjoy. However, it didn't impress me much as a movie. I think the books are just too long and too packed to be made into single movies.

    After the movie, our caravans went to Greendale Mall (where several copies of Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows were purchased) and then retuned to our starting point. [livejournal.com profile] shadowravyn, [livejournal.com profile] etherial, and I (joined for a short time by [livejournal.com profile] shogunhb) stayed up very very late reading, all crashing about 7am. I had set my alarm for 9:30, but - no surprises - I kept resetting it, finally waking up at 11:30 and calling [livejournal.com profile] nightskyre and [livejournal.com profile] anitra to pick me up for Saturday's adventures.

    I saw their new house, which is impressive. The idea of owning a house is a little overwhelming for me, the military brat. I mean, sure, my parents bought houses in many of the places we moved, but it was always known to be a temporary measure. Anyway. Their house is nice, with a great secret corridor, large yard, and sizeable pool. Also, the living room is big enough for the LoveSac. ;) We went out to eat at Red Robin, only my second time there, for yummy food. Afterwards we wandered the shops at Blackstone, spending a decent amount of time in Game Stop and Barnes & Noble. I bought several books at the latter.

    We returned home where my grand plans for the evening were thwarted by a shouldn't-have-been-unexpected crash atop the LoveSac. I napped for a few hours, and it was very nice. Afterwards there was more hanging out at the house (featuring power tools), swimming in their pool after dark, and a trip to Friendly's for ice cream before my bus ride back into Boston. Now I am home and happily sated from my fun weekend of hanging out with people I really like. ♥, guys.
    juldea: (hold me!)
    Recently, I read Jonathan Strange and Mr. Norrell, and I absolutely loved it. Others have told me that they had trouble getting through it, but I didn't. I was delighted to read such an engaging, witty, intelligent, entertaining novel in a style that I associate with dull, bland, stupid, and boring. It made me laugh, it made me cry just a little bit, and it made me go, "Doh! Why didn't I see that 200 pages ago?!" :) I definitely recommend it as a read, but beware that the writing style might put you off. I say go for it anyway.

    I just finished watching Big Fish, a movie that I had heard enough about to grab it in a $1 pile despite knowing nearly nothing about its plot or style. It turned out to be very interesting, very touching, and probably not something I'll ever need to see again. The subject is the relationship between a father who is almost endlessly telling tall tales and his son who is estranged by this while growing up, and their eventual reconciliation when the father is on his deathbed. Three stars but no, "Go see this!"
    juldea: (hold me!)
    Recently, I read Jonathan Strange and Mr. Norrell, and I absolutely loved it. Others have told me that they had trouble getting through it, but I didn't. I was delighted to read such an engaging, witty, intelligent, entertaining novel in a style that I associate with dull, bland, stupid, and boring. It made me laugh, it made me cry just a little bit, and it made me go, "Doh! Why didn't I see that 200 pages ago?!" :) I definitely recommend it as a read, but beware that the writing style might put you off. I say go for it anyway.

    I just finished watching Big Fish, a movie that I had heard enough about to grab it in a $1 pile despite knowing nearly nothing about its plot or style. It turned out to be very interesting, very touching, and probably not something I'll ever need to see again. The subject is the relationship between a father who is almost endlessly telling tall tales and his son who is estranged by this while growing up, and their eventual reconciliation when the father is on his deathbed. Three stars but no, "Go see this!"

    December 2012

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